Educational progress of Nottingham Children in Care exceeds national average.

Chalk

Pupils in care have made better progress through school to their GCSE’s than their peers have nationally.

Provisional data for 2015 shows that the number of Children in Care in Nottingham, who made the expected progress from KS2 to KS4 is higher than the national average.

  • 44% of Nottingham children in care made expected progress in Maths, compared to 29% nationally.
  • 44% of Nottingham children in care made expected progress in English, compared to 39% nationally

This success shows the effort made by schools and pupils working through Key Stage 4. It also recognises the input of The Virtual School for Children in Care, a joint project in the city to help pupils receive the best education possible.

This supports pupils aged 4 to 18, who are looked after by the City Council. Their progress is tracked and support is put in place to help them achieve their best. The Virtual School works with teams across other Nottingham City Council departments as well as external organisations and schools.

Schools have the overall responsibility for monitoring and supporting Children in Care during their education, and are reviewed annually by the Virtual School to make sure the children are achieving their full potential. It’s also a way of sharing good practise around the educational needs of Children in Care.

Councillor David Mellen Portfolio Holder for Early Intervention and Early Years said: “Nottingham City Council is responsible for supporting children who need to be placed in care and a vital part of this is providing them with chances to learn and develop the skills they will need in the future. This achievement by children in Nottingham highlights the need for the council and local services to work together and make the most of opportunities to support vulnerable children.”

The Virtual School recognises and celebrates the achievement of this year’s pupils and will be working closely alongside Ofsted to identify best practice in schools to achieve even better outcomes for Children in Care in the future.

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