Consultation starts on plans to improve Nottingham Schools

EIB website

The Education Improvement Board (EIB) has launched its consultation on plans to improve education outcomes in the city.

The EIB has a ten-year plan to improve schools in Nottingham and is now consulting with head teachers, teachers, governors, parents and the wider public on the proposals.

The board, made up of city leaders and education professionals, believes a long-term vision and plan is required for Nottingham to deliver a world-class education service which serves its young people and families.

Members have been working on a ten-year programme looking at provision in Nottingham. They want to develop the existing vision for education in the city and create a strategic plan with clear priorities and timelines from 2015 to 2025.

The goal of ‘Ambition 2025: the 10-year programme,’ is to ensure everyone supports, nurtures and develops the talents and aspirations of young people in Nottingham.

The EIB believes the first three priorities should be:

  1. Teacher retention and recruitment
  2. Mathematics as a driver for improved outcomes
  3. Transition from primary to secondary schools

Everyone involved in a child’s education has the responsibility to ensure they have the best chance to achieve and access the opportunities around them locally, nationally and globally. The EIB is consulting in order to gain the views of everyone involved in education across the city.

Professor Sir David Greenaway, Chair of the Education Improvement Board, said: “The EIB is here to bring together ideas about how we can provide the best possible education for every child and young person in Nottingham.

“I firmly believe we will not make real progress unless we collaborate in doing this work. I hope to engage with as many partners as possible, seek their views, and benefit from their expertise. I want people to tell me what we should prioritise and how they would like to be involved.

“I am confident we can share our strengths to address the challenges currently facing education in Nottingham. The city’s children and young people are entitled to expect this of us.”

Schoolchildren and their teacher in a primary class

Councillor Sam Webster, Portfolio Holder for Schools at Nottingham City Council, said: “We need people to have their say. It’s vital that we get feedback from education professionals and parent or carers – only by hearing different voices will we be able to implement a cohesive plan on which we can all agree.

“I am confident we can share our strengths to address the challenges currently facing education in Nottingham. The city’s children and young people are entitled to expect this of us. Every child in Nottingham deserves to go to a good school and by everyone working together we can make this a reality.”

The Education Improvement Board was set up a year ago to promote collaboration and bring together ideas about how we can provide the best possible education for every child and young person in Nottingham. Members of the board include Councillor Jon Collins, Leader of Nottingham City Council, head teachers from schools and academies in the city, and both Nottingham Trent University and the University of Nottingham.

In the year since it was first established, the EIB has made some progress. It has developed proposals for an accredited Governors Academy, run an effective school attendance campaign, conducted a series of in-school peer reviews, and produced a new charter for pupil behaviour.

The consultation will run throughout November.

To have your say on the proposals, visit www.nottinghamschools.org

EDUCATION IMPROVEMENT BOARD

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